Long gone are the days when women were told not to exercise in pregnancy. Thankfully now there is plenty of evidence to show the more active and fit you are during pregnancy, the easier your pregnancy and labour will be. Your body will be better prepared for the shape changes and weight gains you will experience. It is also proven to help you deal with labour and to bounce back into shape once baby arrives.

Despite what some people will have you believe, exercise is not dangerous for your baby. However, there is some consensus that being pregnant is not the time to take up a new sport at a strenuous level. Keeping up your normal sport is the safest option. Many women continue with running, yoga, dancing, Pilates, swimming, aerobics and even weight lifting for as long as they feel comfortable.

The advice is not to overdo it and listen to your body. As a general rule you should be able to hold a conversation with ease. If you become breathless when talking it’s a sign you are overdoing it and should scale back your effort.

If you decide to join an exercise class suitable for you during your pregnancy, let your instructor know and they will alter your exercises accordingly to accommodate you being pregnant. Make sure your instructor is properly qualified first!

If exercise classes or sport are not your thing it’s advisable you keep active on a daily basis by walking half an hour a day. Monitoring your daily steps on your watch or fitbit is a good way to help you track this.

And don’t forget your pelvic floor exercises. It’s really important you strengthen these muscles as your pelvic floor will come under great strain during the latter stages of pregnancy, labour and birth. If your pelvic floor is weak, you may find you suffer from stress incontinence and leak urine when you cough, sneeze or strain. It is commonly linked to pregnancy and can continue after birth. Doing pelvic floor exercises will help reduce or avoid stress incontinence and every pregnant women should do them, regardless of age or fitness.

Find out more about pelvic floor exercises and preventing, living with, and treating incontinence from the NHS or speak to your doctor.

Long gone are the days when women were told not to exercise in pregnancy. Thankfully now there is plenty of evidence to show the more active and fit you are during pregnancy, the easier your pregnancy and labour will be. Your body will be better prepared for the shape changes and weight gains you will experience. It is also proven to help you deal with labour and to bounce back into shape once baby arrives.

Despite what some people will have you believe, exercise is not dangerous for your baby. However, there is some consensus that being pregnant is not the time to take up a new sport at a strenuous level. Keeping up your normal sport is the safest option. Many women continue with running, yoga, dancing, Pilates, swimming, aerobics and even weight lifting for as long as they feel comfortable.

The advice is not to overdo it and listen to your body. As a general rule you should be able to hold a conversation with ease. If you become breathless when talking it’s a sign you are overdoing it and should scale back your effort.

If you decide to join an exercise class suitable for you during your pregnancy, let your instructor know and they will alter your exercises accordingly to accommodate you being pregnant. Make sure your instructor is properly qualified first!

If exercise classes or sport are not your thing it’s advisable you keep active on a daily basis by walking half an hour a day. Monitoring your daily steps on your watch or fitbit is a good way to help you track this.

And don’t forget your pelvic floor exercises. It’s really important you strengthen these muscles as your pelvic floor will come under great strain during the latter stages of pregnancy, labour and birth. If your pelvic floor is weak, you may find you suffer from stress incontinence and leak urine when you cough, sneeze or strain. It is commonly linked to pregnancy and can continue after birth. Doing pelvic floor exercises will help reduce or avoid stress incontinence and every pregnant women should do them, regardless of age or fitness.

Find out more about pelvic floor exercises and preventing, living with, and treating incontinence from the NHS or speak to your doctor.